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Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers

Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers PDF Author: Gerald R. Hubbell
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9783319219059
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 235

Book Description
Amateur astronomers who want to enhance their capabilities to contribute to science need look no farther than this guide to using remote observatories. The contributors cover how to build your own remote observatory as well as the existing infrastructure of commercial networks of remote observatories that are available to the amateur. They provide specific advice on which programs to use based on your project objectives and offer practical project suggestions. Remotely controlled observatories have many advantages—the most obvious that the observer does not have to be physically present to carry out observations. Such an observatory can also be used more fully because its time can be scheduled and usefully shared among several astronomers working on different observing projects. More and more professional-level observatories are open to use by amateurs in this way via the Internet, and more advanced amateur astronomers can even build their own remote observatories for sharing among members of a society or interest group. Endorsements: “Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers Using High-Powered Telescopes from Home, by Jerry Hubbell, Rich Williams, and Linda Billard, is a unique contribution centering on computer-controlled private observatories owned by amateur astronomers and commercialized professional–amateur observatories where observing time to collect data can be purchased. Before this book, trying to piece together all of the necessary elements and processes that make up a remotely operated observatory was daunting. The authors and contributors have provided, in this single publication, a wealth of information gained from years of experience that will save you considerable money and countless hours in trying to develop such an observatory. If you follow the methods and processes laid out in this book and choose to build your own remotely operated observatory or decide to become a regular user of one of the commercial networks, you will not only join an elite group of advanced astronomers who make regular submissions to science, but you will become a member of an ancient fraternity. Your high-technology observatory will contain a “high-powered telescope” no matter how large it is, and from the comfort of home, you can actively contribute to the work that started in pre-history to help uncover the secrets of the cosmos.” Scott Roberts Founder and President, Explore Scientific, LLC. “In the past three and a half decades, since I first became involved with remote observatories, the use of remote, unmanned telescopes at fully automated observatories has advanced from a very rare approach for making astronomical observations to an increasingly dominant mode for observation among both professional and amateur astronomers. I am very pleased to see this timely book being published on the topic. I highly recommend this book to readers because it not only covers the knowledge needed to become an informed user of existing remote observatories, but also describes what you need to know to develop your own remote observatory. It draws on more than two decades of remote observatory operation and networking by coauthor Rich Williams as he developed the Sierra Stars Observatory Network (SSON) into the world-class network it is today. This book is the ideal follow-on to coauthor Jerry Hubbell’s book Scientific Astrophotography (Springer 2012). Remote observatories have a bright future, opening up astronomy to a new and much larger generation of professional, amateur, and student observers. Machines and humans can and do work well together. I hope you enjoy reading this book as much as I have and will take advantage of the developments over the past several decades by the many pioneers of remote observatories.” Russ Genet, PhD. California Polytechnic State University Observing Saturn for the first time is a memory that stays with us for the rest of our lives, and for many it is the start of an odyssey--an odyssey into observational astronomy. Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers is a book written for observers, beginners, and old hands alike, providing detailed advice to those wishing to improve their observing skills. Many will want to build and operate a remotely controlled observatory, and for those, Part I of this book is an invaluable source of information. If, like me, you choose to avoid the capital outlay of owning your own facility, Part II describes how you can use one of the many professionally run large scopes where, for a few dollars, you can capture spectacular color images of nebulae, galaxies, and comets. My own scientific interest in short period eclipsing binaries has been made possible through the availability of remote telescopes such as those operated by the Sierra Stars Observatory Network (SSON). Whichever route you take, this book is essential reading for all who aspire to serious observing. David Pulley The Local Group (UK)

Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers

Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers PDF Author: Gerald R. Hubbell
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9783319219059
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 235

Book Description
Amateur astronomers who want to enhance their capabilities to contribute to science need look no farther than this guide to using remote observatories. The contributors cover how to build your own remote observatory as well as the existing infrastructure of commercial networks of remote observatories that are available to the amateur. They provide specific advice on which programs to use based on your project objectives and offer practical project suggestions. Remotely controlled observatories have many advantages—the most obvious that the observer does not have to be physically present to carry out observations. Such an observatory can also be used more fully because its time can be scheduled and usefully shared among several astronomers working on different observing projects. More and more professional-level observatories are open to use by amateurs in this way via the Internet, and more advanced amateur astronomers can even build their own remote observatories for sharing among members of a society or interest group. Endorsements: “Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers Using High-Powered Telescopes from Home, by Jerry Hubbell, Rich Williams, and Linda Billard, is a unique contribution centering on computer-controlled private observatories owned by amateur astronomers and commercialized professional–amateur observatories where observing time to collect data can be purchased. Before this book, trying to piece together all of the necessary elements and processes that make up a remotely operated observatory was daunting. The authors and contributors have provided, in this single publication, a wealth of information gained from years of experience that will save you considerable money and countless hours in trying to develop such an observatory. If you follow the methods and processes laid out in this book and choose to build your own remotely operated observatory or decide to become a regular user of one of the commercial networks, you will not only join an elite group of advanced astronomers who make regular submissions to science, but you will become a member of an ancient fraternity. Your high-technology observatory will contain a “high-powered telescope” no matter how large it is, and from the comfort of home, you can actively contribute to the work that started in pre-history to help uncover the secrets of the cosmos.” Scott Roberts Founder and President, Explore Scientific, LLC. “In the past three and a half decades, since I first became involved with remote observatories, the use of remote, unmanned telescopes at fully automated observatories has advanced from a very rare approach for making astronomical observations to an increasingly dominant mode for observation among both professional and amateur astronomers. I am very pleased to see this timely book being published on the topic. I highly recommend this book to readers because it not only covers the knowledge needed to become an informed user of existing remote observatories, but also describes what you need to know to develop your own remote observatory. It draws on more than two decades of remote observatory operation and networking by coauthor Rich Williams as he developed the Sierra Stars Observatory Network (SSON) into the world-class network it is today. This book is the ideal follow-on to coauthor Jerry Hubbell’s book Scientific Astrophotography (Springer 2012). Remote observatories have a bright future, opening up astronomy to a new and much larger generation of professional, amateur, and student observers. Machines and humans can and do work well together. I hope you enjoy reading this book as much as I have and will take advantage of the developments over the past several decades by the many pioneers of remote observatories.” Russ Genet, PhD. California Polytechnic State University Observing Saturn for the first time is a memory that stays with us for the rest of our lives, and for many it is the start of an odyssey--an odyssey into observational astronomy. Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers is a book written for observers, beginners, and old hands alike, providing detailed advice to those wishing to improve their observing skills. Many will want to build and operate a remotely controlled observatory, and for those, Part I of this book is an invaluable source of information. If, like me, you choose to avoid the capital outlay of owning your own facility, Part II describes how you can use one of the many professionally run large scopes where, for a few dollars, you can capture spectacular color images of nebulae, galaxies, and comets. My own scientific interest in short period eclipsing binaries has been made possible through the availability of remote telescopes such as those operated by the Sierra Stars Observatory Network (SSON). Whichever route you take, this book is essential reading for all who aspire to serious observing. David Pulley The Local Group (UK)

Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers

Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers PDF Author: Gerald R. Hubbell
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319219065
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 235

Book Description
Amateur astronomers who want to enhance their capabilities to contribute to science need look no farther than this guide to using remote observatories. The contributors cover how to build your own remote observatory as well as the existing infrastructure of commercial networks of remote observatories that are available to the amateur. They provide specific advice on which programs to use based on your project objectives and offer practical project suggestions. Remotely controlled observatories have many advantages—the most obvious that the observer does not have to be physically present to carry out observations. Such an observatory can also be used more fully because its time can be scheduled and usefully shared among several astronomers working on different observing projects. More and more professional-level observatories are open to use by amateurs in this way via the Internet, and more advanced amateur astronomers can even build their own remote observatories for sharing among members of a society or interest group. Endorsements: “Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers Using High-Powered Telescopes from Home, by Jerry Hubbell, Rich Williams, and Linda Billard, is a unique contribution centering on computer-controlled private observatories owned by amateur astronomers and commercialized professional–amateur observatories where observing time to collect data can be purchased. Before this book, trying to piece together all of the necessary elements and processes that make up a remotely operated observatory was daunting. The authors and contributors have provided, in this single publication, a wealth of information gained from years of experience that will save you considerable money and countless hours in trying to develop such an observatory. If you follow the methods and processes laid out in this book and choose to build your own remotely operated observatory or decide to become a regular user of one of the commercial networks, you will not only join an elite group of advanced astronomers who make regular submissions to science, but you will become a member of an ancient fraternity. Your high-technology observatory will contain a “high-powered telescope” no matter how large it is, and from the comfort of home, you can actively contribute to the work that started in pre-history to help uncover the secrets of the cosmos.” Scott Roberts Founder and President, Explore Scientific, LLC. “In the past three and a half decades, since I first became involved with remote observatories, the use of remote, unmanned telescopes at fully automated observatories has advanced from a very rare approach for making astronomical observations to an increasingly dominant mode for observation among both professional and amateur astronomers. I am very pleased to see this timely book being published on the topic. I highly recommend this book to readers because it not only covers the knowledge needed to become an informed user of existing remote observatories, but also describes what you need to know to develop your own remote observatory. It draws on more than two decades of remote observatory operation and networking by coauthor Rich Williams as he developed the Sierra Stars Observatory Network (SSON) into the world-class network it is today. This book is the ideal follow-on to coauthor Jerry Hubbell’s book Scientific Astrophotography (Springer 2012). Remote observatories have a bright future, opening up astronomy to a new and much larger generation of professional, amateur, and student observers. Machines and humans can and do work well together. I hope you enjoy reading this book as much as I have and will take advantage of the developments over the past several decades by the many pioneers of remote observatories.” Russ Genet, PhD. California Polytechnic State University Observing Saturn for the first time is a memory that stays with us for the rest of our lives, and for many it is the start of an odyssey--an odyssey into observational astronomy. Remote Observatories for Amateur Astronomers is a book written for observers, beginners, and old hands alike, providing detailed advice to those wishing to improve their observing skills. Many will want to build and operate a remotely controlled observatory, and for those, Part I of this book is an invaluable source of information. If, like me, you choose to avoid the capital outlay of owning your own facility, Part II describes how you can use one of the many professionally run large scopes where, for a few dollars, you can capture spectacular color images of nebulae, galaxies, and comets. My own scientific interest in short period eclipsing binaries has been made possible through the availability of remote telescopes such as those operated by the Sierra Stars Observatory Network (SSON). Whichever route you take, this book is essential reading for all who aspire to serious observing. David Pulley The Local Group (UK)

Astronomy Adventures and Vacations

Astronomy Adventures and Vacations PDF Author: Timothy Treadwell
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319500023
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 262

Book Description
This astronomy travel guide examines the many wonderful opportunities for experiencing the observing hobby. Amateur astronomy is often consigned to observing from home or from a local park, yet it can be much more. Tim Treadwell explores all the possibilities of astronomical and space-related activities that are available on day trips and longer vacations. These activities range from observatory visits and other simple ways to build an astronomy event into a holiday, to full blown specialized astronomy travel. Many trips give the opportunity to visit some of the world’s famous attractions. On most vacations it can be a matter of just taking a day (or night) out of your schedule to fit in an astronomy event, but larger, dedicated pilgrimages are also possible. How to make the most of astronomy potential on a holiday, whether observing on the beach in Hawaii with the Telescope Guy or visiting Star City in Russia, is covered in detail. Go to a star party, explore the national parks or see the northern lights! There are a wide variety of activities for all budgets described in this book.

From Casual Stargazer to Amateur Astronomer

From Casual Stargazer to Amateur Astronomer PDF Author: Dave Eagle
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461487668
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 258

Book Description
The beginning astronomical observer passes through a series of stages. The initial stage is hugely exciting and gives the beginner a real buzz as he discovers some of the faint fuzzy objects, markings on the planets, rings around Saturn and the craters on the Moon. But as the novice observer progresses, he or she wants to know what more there is than looking at faint fuzzy blobs or indistinct planet markings. Many jump to the conclusion – wrongly – that they need to spend lots of money on expensive equipment to progress. “From Casual Stargazer to Amateur Astronomer” has been written specifically to address this group of budding stargazers. Astronomy is much more than a quick sightseeing tour. Patient observers who can develop their skills will start to appreciate what they are seeing, and will know exactly what to look out for on any particular night. And equally important, they will learn what not to expect to see. “From Casual Stargazer to Amateur Astronomer” is for those who want to develop observing skills beyond mere sightseeing, and learn some of the techniques used to carry out enjoyable – and scientifically useful – observations. It will also direct readers to make informed choices about what can be seen and when. This book is for anyone keen to develop their skills as an amateur astronomer.

Yearbook of Astronomy 2022

Yearbook of Astronomy 2022 PDF Author: Brian Jones
Publisher: White Owl
ISBN: 1526790084
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 354

Book Description
The Yearbook of Astronomy 2022 is the Diamond Jubilee edition of this iconic publication, the annual appearance of which has been eagerly anticipated by astronomers, both amateur and professional, ever since this invaluable book first appeared in 1962. As the preface to the 1962 edition informed its readers, the post-war years had seen a tremendous growth of interest in astronomy and space research. Doubtless fueled by the dawn of the Space Age, the launch of Sputnik 1 in October 1957 marked a significant change in the course of history. This epoch-making event, coupled with the subsequent flights of Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin (April 1961) and American astronaut Alan Shepard (May 1961), served to engender a public interest in astronomy and space that has continued to grow and expand to this day. Maintaining its appealing style and presentation, the Yearbook of Astronomy 2022 contains comprehensive jargon-free monthly sky notes and an authoritative set of sky charts to enable backyard astronomers and sky gazers everywhere to plan their viewing of the year’s eclipses, comets, meteor showers and minor planets as well as detailing the phases of the Moon and visibility and locations of the planets throughout the year. To supplement all this is a variety of entertaining and informative articles, a feature for which the Yearbook of Astronomy is known. In the 2022 edition, the reader is presented with articles covering a wide range of topics including "A History of the Amateur Astronomical Society: 1962 to 2022"; "Expanding Cosmic Horizons"; "Frank Drake and His Equation"; "Remote Telescopes"; "Skies Over Ancient America" and others. The Yearbook of Astronomy continues to be essential reading for anyone lured and fascinated by the magic of astronomy. It remains an inspiration to amateur and professional astronomers alike, and warrants a place on the bookshelf of all stargazers and watchers of the Universe.

A Question and Answer Guide to Astronomy

A Question and Answer Guide to Astronomy PDF Author: Carol Christian
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 131661526X
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 361

Book Description
Contains 250 questions and answers about astronomy, particular for the amateur astronomer.

Dictionary of Minor Planet Names

Dictionary of Minor Planet Names PDF Author: Lutz D. Schmadel
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3642297188
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 1452

Book Description
The quantity of numbered minor planets has now well exceeded a quarter million. The new sixth edition of the Dictionary of Minor Planet Names, which is the IAU’s official reference work for the field, now covers more than 17,000 named minor planets. In addition to being of practical value for identification purposes, the Dictionary of Minor Planet Names provides authoritative information on the basis of the rich and colorful variety of ingenious names, from heavenly goddesses to artists, from scientists to Nobel laureates, from historical or political figures to ordinary women and men, from mountains to buildings, as well as a variety of compound terms and curiosities. This sixth edition of the Dictionary of Minor Planet Names has grown by more than 7,000 entries compared to the fifth edition and by more than 2,000 compared to the fifth edition, including its two addenda published in 2006 and 2009. In addition, there are many corrections, revisions and updates to the entries published in earlier editions. This work is an abundant source of information for anyone interested in minor planets and who enjoys reading about the people and things minor planets commemorate.

Setting-Up a Small Observatory: From Concept to Construction

Setting-Up a Small Observatory: From Concept to Construction PDF Author: David Arditti
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 0387686215
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 235

Book Description
Arditti’s approachable work covers the all the details of design, siting and construction – once a basic type has been decided upon. It is written in a way that is equally applicable to the USA and UK (where there are slightly different building regulations) and deals with matters that are basic to building and commissioning any amateur observatory. Uniquely, David Arditti also considers the aesthetics of amateur observatories – fitting them in with family and neighbors, and maybe disguising them as more common garden buildings if necessary. Every amateur astronomer who wants a purpose-built observatory (and let’s face it, which one of them doesn’t?) will find this book invaluable.

CAP2007 Conference Proceedings

CAP2007 Conference Proceedings PDF Author:
Publisher: European Space Agency
ISBN:
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 550

Book Description


Remote Viewing

Remote Viewing PDF Author: Courtney Brown
Publisher: Farsight, Inc.
ISBN: 9780976676201
Category : Body, Mind & Spirit
Languages : en
Pages : 354

Book Description
Remote viewing is the mental ability to perceive and describe places, persons, or events at distant locations in the past, present, and future. This book describes the science and theory of the remote-viewing phenomenon. The reality of the remote-viewing phenomenon is not in dispute among a large body of respected researchers ¿ both inside and outside of academia ¿ who have published an extensive collection of high-quality investigations over the past few decades. But profound mysteries remain. This volume breaks new ground by resolving some of remote-viewing¿s greatest enigmas. In these pages, new research and new theories explain why remote viewing works, and why it is scientifically possible. These investigations utilize remote-viewing methods that are derivative of those used for decades in well-documented U.S. government funded psi research sponsored by the Central Intelligence Agency (C.I.A.) and the Defense Intelligence Agency (D.I.A.). Filled with descriptions and analyses of highly original experiments, here is an investigation into the fascinating characteristics of time and physical reality using remote viewing as a tool of exploration, offering evidence that the past, present, and future truly exist simultaneously. The idea of differing future and past time lines is not just science fiction.