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American Education, Democracy, and the Second World War

American Education, Democracy, and the Second World War PDF Author: C. Dorn
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230608884
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 257

Book Description
American Education, Democracy, and the Second World War examines how U.S. educational institutions during World War II responded to the dilemma of whether to serve as "weapons" in the nation s arsenal of democracy or "citadels" in safeguarding the American way of life. By studying the lives of wartime Americans, as well as nursery schools, elementary and secondary schools, and universities, Charles Dorn makes the case that although wartime pressures affected educational institutions to varying degrees, these institutions resisted efforts to be placed solely in service of the nation s war machine. Instead, Dorn argues, American education maintained a sturdy commitment to fostering civic mindedness in a society characterized by rapid technological advance and the perception of an ever-increasing threat to national security.

American Education, Democracy, and the Second World War

American Education, Democracy, and the Second World War PDF Author: C. Dorn
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230608884
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 257

Book Description
American Education, Democracy, and the Second World War examines how U.S. educational institutions during World War II responded to the dilemma of whether to serve as "weapons" in the nation s arsenal of democracy or "citadels" in safeguarding the American way of life. By studying the lives of wartime Americans, as well as nursery schools, elementary and secondary schools, and universities, Charles Dorn makes the case that although wartime pressures affected educational institutions to varying degrees, these institutions resisted efforts to be placed solely in service of the nation s war machine. Instead, Dorn argues, American education maintained a sturdy commitment to fostering civic mindedness in a society characterized by rapid technological advance and the perception of an ever-increasing threat to national security.

Wartime Schooling and Education Policy in the Second World War

Wartime Schooling and Education Policy in the Second World War PDF Author: Sarah Van Ruyskensvelde
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137520116
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 220

Book Description
This book deals with the development of private secondary schooling during the Second World War in Belgium. It focuses on how the German occupier used education to gain acceptance of the regime, and discusses the attitudes of Belgian education authorities, schools, teachers and pupils towards the German occupation. Suggesting that the occupation forced Belgian education authorities, such as the Roman Catholic Church, to take certain positions, the book explores the wartime experiences and memories of pupils and teachers. It explains that the German Culture Department was relatively weak in establishing total control over education and that Catholic schools were able to maintain their education project during the war. However, the book also reveals that, in some cases, the German occupation did not need total control over education in order to find support for some authoritarian ideas. As such, Van Ruyskenvelde’s analysis presents a nuanced view of the image of the Catholic Church, schools, teachers and pupils as mere victims of war.

Dialogues on the Delta

Dialogues on the Delta PDF Author: Martín Camps
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1527514706
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 249

Book Description
This collection of essays examines the city of Stockton, California from an interdisciplinary perspective. Stockton is in the heart of the Central Valley, an agricultural region that comprises a diverse population and rich history. This book covers the economic downturn of the city that was ground zero for the housing market crisis during the Great Recession, which resulted in it becoming the first major American city to declare bankruptcy. Nevertheless, the city cannot be framed only on its economic misfortunes; Stockton has a vibrant community with important historical figures such as Martín Ramírez, an outsider painter who was a patient in the Stockton State Hospital. This book also covers topics such as food studies, religious communities, historical resources at the library at the University of the Pacific, business community programs such as “Puentes”, an overview of the city’s racial diversity, auto-ethnographies, the family connection to Mexican author Elena Poniatowska, and a program at the Stockton High School during WWII to send jeeps as part of the war effort. This book is informed by the perspectives of historians, sociologists, political scientists, economists, business scholars, and literary and cultural studies theorists to provide a wide range of approaches to a vital community in the Central Valley of California.

Color in the Classroom

Color in the Classroom PDF Author: Zoe Burkholder
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199876967
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 264

Book Description
Between the turn of the twentieth century and the Brown v. Board of Education decision in 1954, the way that American schools taught about "race" changed dramatically. This transformation was engineered by the nation's most prominent anthropologists, including Franz Boas, Ruth Benedict, and Margaret Mead, during World War II. Inspired by scientific racism in Nazi Germany, these activist scholars decided that the best way to fight racial prejudice was to teach what they saw as the truth about race in the institution that had the power to do the most good-American schools. Anthropologists created lesson plans, lectures, courses, and pamphlets designed to revise what they called "the 'race' concept" in American education. They believed that if teachers presented race in scientific and egalitarian terms, conveying human diversity as learned habits of culture rather than innate characteristics, American citizens would become less racist. Although nearly forgotten today, this educational reform movement represents an important component of early civil rights activism that emerged alongside the domestic and global tensions of wartime. Drawing on hundreds of first-hand accounts written by teachers nationwide, Zoë Burkholder traces the influence of this anthropological activism on the way that teachers understood, spoke, and taught about race. She explains how and why teachers readily understood certain theoretical concepts, such as the division of race into three main categories, while they struggled to make sense of more complex models of cultural diversity and structural inequality. As they translated theories into practice, teachers crafted an educational discourse on race that differed significantly from the definition of race produced by scientists at mid-century. Schoolteachers and their approach to race were put into the spotlight with the Brown v. Board of Education case, but the belief that racially integrated schools would eradicate racism in the next generation and eliminate the need for discussion of racial inequality long predated this. Discussions of race in the classroom were silenced during the early Cold War until a new generation of antiracist, "multicultural" educators emerged in the 1970s.

To Promote the General Welfare

To Promote the General Welfare PDF Author: Steven Conn
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199858551
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 233

Book Description
Americans love to hate their government. There is a long tradition of anti-government suspicion that goes back all the way to the founding of the nation. The election of Barack Obama, however, has created one the largest backlashes against government in our history. Tea partiers, fueled bytalk radio and cable TV demagogues, have created a political atmosphere of anger and hostility toward our government rivaled perhaps only by the pre-Civil War era of the 1850s.Lost at the Tea Party rallies and in talk radio fulminations, however, is this simple fact: the federal government plays a central role in making our society function, and it always has.This book is a collection of essays to remind Americans of that fact. Written by some of the nation's foremost and most engaging scholars, this book considers ten key aspects of American life - from education, to communication, to housing, and health - and charts the way the federal government hascontributed to American progress and everyday life. Essential - and fun - reading for anyone who wants to understand our political history and our political present, it will help inform the choices we must make about our future.

Educational Regimes and Anglo-American Democracy

Educational Regimes and Anglo-American Democracy PDF Author: Ronald A. Manzer
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9780802087805
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 602

Book Description
Manzer's comparative political study of schools in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States focuses on five fundamental problems in the historical development of Anglo-American educational regimes: the original creation of systems of elementary education in the nineteenth century as publicly provided and publicly governed; the transformation of secondary schools in the early twentieth century to match the emerging structure of occupational classes in capitalist industrial economies; the planning for secondary schools in the development of the welfare state after the Second World War; the accommodation of social diversity in public schools from the 1960s to the 1990s in response to increasingly strong assertions of ethnicity, language, race, and religion, not only as criteria for equal treatment, but also as foundations of communal identity; and more.

Between Citizens and the State

Between Citizens and the State PDF Author: Christopher P. Loss
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691163340
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 344

Book Description
This book tracks the dramatic outcomes of the federal government's growing involvement in higher education between World War I and the 1970s, and the conservative backlash against that involvement from the 1980s onward. Using cutting-edge analysis, Christopher Loss recovers higher education's central importance to the larger social and political history of the United States in the twentieth century, and chronicles its transformation into a key mediating institution between citizens and the state. Framed around the three major federal higher education policies of the twentieth century--the 1944 GI Bill, the 1958 National Defense Education Act, and the 1965 Higher Education Act--the book charts the federal government's various efforts to deploy education to ready citizens for the national, bureaucratized, and increasingly global world in which they lived. Loss details the myriad ways in which academic leaders and students shaped, and were shaped by, the state's shifting political agenda as it moved from a preoccupation with economic security during the Great Depression, to national security during World War II and the Cold War, to securing the rights of African Americans, women, and other previously marginalized groups during the 1960s and '70s. Along the way, Loss reappraises the origins of higher education's current-day diversity regime, the growth of identity group politics, and the privatization of citizenship at the close of the twentieth century. At a time when people's faith in government and higher education is being sorely tested, this book sheds new light on the close relations between American higher education and politics.

In the Shadow of Authoritarianism

In the Shadow of Authoritarianism PDF Author: Thomas D. Fallace
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807776920
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 215

Book Description
In the Shadow of Authoritarianism explores how American educators, in the wake of World War I, created a student-centered curriculum in response to authoritarian threats abroad. For most of the 20th century, American educators lived in the shadow of ideological, political, cultural, and existential threats (including Prussianism, propaganda, collectivism, dictatorship, totalitarianism, mind control, the space race, and moral relativity). To meet the perceived threat, the American curriculum was gradually moved in a more student-centered direction that focused less on “what to think” and more on “how to think.” This book examines the period between World War I and the 1980s, focusing on how U.S. schools countered the influence of fascist and communist ideologies, as well as racial discrimination. Fallace also considers this approach in light of current interests in the Common Core State Standards. “Perhaps the recent rise of new authoritarian threats—not just abroad, but also at home—will rejuvenate our long tradition of democratic education. Schools have served as the bulwarks of democracy before. Let's hope they can do so again, guided by this smart little book.” —Jonathan Zimmerman, University of Pennsylvania “Fallace offers a fresh, provocative history of democratic education as it has been practiced in the United States.” —Walter Parker, University of Washington

Reflections on My Life

Reflections on My Life PDF Author: Thomas H. Olbricht
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1608994856
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 470

Book Description
Thomas H. Olbricht grew up in Churches of Christ, has taught in several of their universities, and has given religious lectures on six continents and in most states in the United States. He has met most leaders in Churches of Christ globally. He has been active in several religious and rhetoric societies and has worked with leaders in all these organizations to bring about changes over the past sixty years. C. Clifton Black and Duane F. Watson wrote about Olbricht, "Tom Olbricht possesses a memory of elephantine proportions. Not only does he have at his fingertips the names and places and dates; better than most he understands how the study of rhetoric has flourished among, while cross-pollinating, multiple disciplines in the humanities, classics, English, speech communication, and religion."

Education and the Second World War

Education and the Second World War PDF Author: Roy Lowe
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780750700542
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 243

Book Description